NEW RESEARCH STUDY FOR WOMEN WITH FAMILY HISTORY OF BREAST CANCER

Young women

 

What is the study about?

 

Many women gain weight during adulthood, and this weight gain is known to increase breast cancer risk.  Our new research study is looking at how we can prevent weight gain in young women with a family history of breast cancer.

 

Before a weight gain prevention programme is developed, we want to talk to young women about whether a programme of this kind is acceptable, and what women think such a programme should involve.

 

Young women

 

What happens on the study?

 

We are interviewing up to twenty-five women, aged 18-35 years, who are a healthy weight (Body Mass Index (BMI) between 18.5 and 23.99 kg/m2) and who are at increased risk of breast cancer.  The women will be recruited from the Family History Clinic at The Prevent Breast Cancer Research Unit at The Nightingale Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital. The interviews will help us to understand if the idea of a weight gain prevention programme, that aims to reduce women’s risk of breast cancer, is acceptable and appealing. Women will be asked questions about their perceptions and experiences of controlling their weight, as well as the preferred format and title of a weight gain prevention programme.

 

The research is being carried out by the Lifestyle Research Team at The Prevent Breast Cancer Research Unit in collaboration with The University of Manchester.  The interviews will happen in women’s homes or at another location of their choosing.

 

Young women

 

What impact will this study have?

 

The findings from this study will enable us to understand whether young women with a family history of breast cancer, will engage with a weight gain prevention programme. The opinions gathered will help to design a programme that we hope to trial in clinic and if successful, implement within family history clinics across the UK in order to help young women to maintain a healthy weight and manage their risk of breast cancer.

 

Where can I get further information?

 

For more information about this study, please contact the Lifestyle Research Team on lifestyleresearch@nhs.net.

 

 

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